Famous American Writers

American literature started from somewhere. The big question is where it came from. Let's date back to the contemporary era, which took place just after World War 1. This was an excellent time for the USA as writers now developed their form of writing that didn't involve the English traditions of writing borrowed from British Literature. Here we need to appreciate essayists like Ernest Hemingway and Eliot who embraced and cultivated on modernism in their pieces of literature. This was early to the mid 19th century.

During this time, essay writers came up with ideologies and opinions that went against the standard conform of society. They started questioning the ongoing traditions and beliefs that members of the community took so seriously. It was all about human perception. It was the dawn of reality for those in the dark as it awakened the thoughts of many who were in the dark.

The modern essay writers had firm beliefs that what the persona thinks is of more importance as compared to the plot of the story. Here we saw essay writing incorporating some of the literature tools like satire, humor, and imagery. These tools were all to make the express the events more clear and emphasize the message.

This massive paradigm shift from depicting some of the actions that went on in the world to appeal to aspects of emotional intelligence and human psychology was remarkable. Such is what contributed to what American literature is today.

Exemplary Famous American Essayists

American literature has come too far, and this can be attributed to the groundbreakers that made it happen. In this article, we're going to look at some of the great African-American writers who made it to the top.

  1. Jupiter Hammon

History lives to remember Jupiter for his significant contribution to American literature. Jupiter was an outstanding essays and poems writer who came up as the first black to get his writings documented. His early work was the poem titled An Evening Thought. This poem touched the hearts of many individuals who read it. Jupiter was also a man of the Bible, and through his writings, he managed to get out the word of God to the people. The many other poems written by him were a real inspiration to those who were interested in the word.

He was a human rights activist who wished for freedom for his people but throughout his life never got a chance to enjoy the freedom himself. In the times of the Great War in America, he took key roles in some of deliberating parties and organizations that represented the rights of Africans in the city of New York. He went ahead to address the legislating body at that time where he made it clear that the heaven that is to come is free of slavery and black oppression. His writings took a significant role in contributing to the abolition of slavery and made an impact on the US government.

  1. William Wells Brown

Brown was an exemplary writer of his time through his essay writing and creativity that intrigued quite a number of the many who took a chance to read them. He was a victim of ongoing slavery and black oppression. Some of his books include; Written by Himself, a Fugitive Slave

It was during the implementation of the fugitive slave law in the mid 19th century that prompted Wells to flee the USA and live in another country. However, this did not stop him from writing and creativity in his touching and inspirational words. Later on, after fleeing, he went on and published his debut novel Clotel. It was a touching story expressing the life of slaves in the US. This was later appraised by the literature society as the first ever published African-American novel.

  1. Laurence Dunbar

Once or twice during your literature studies, you've heard of these essays and poems by Dunbar. Some say the creativity and imagery this magnificent poet possessed was unmatched, and we couldn't agree more. He was also a victim of the ongoing slavery and Negro life in the states. It was a robust experience for Dunbar, and unlike other slaves, things turned out different for him.

Years before the Harlem revival, Dunbar wrote about the sufferings that blacks went through in the hands of the white oppressors. Him being a slave, the expressions were first hand. This was just but a start for him. He later went on to publish poems even in the vernacular language just so to reach the necessary audience he targeted. This gave him popularity and made him one of the most influential African-American writers of that age.

In his essay writing and poetry, Dunbar incorporated literature tools like humor, satire, and imagery. He went one to write poems on romance to remind the African-Americans that despite the oppression, love conquers all. Some of the poems he wrote;

Malindy sings, and We Wear the Mask

  1. Countee Cullen

He was a great poet of his time. Cullen studied literature quite well and went on to read some of the poems by renowned poets like Wordsworth and Keats. He later borrowed their poetic styles and used them to come up with his pieces on various topics in the community. He wrote poems on self-awareness, racial prejudice and separation of the blacks from the white people of USA. Such poems written by Cullen were a perfect reflection of what was going on in some of the white homes in the USA.

Later, when the Harlem revival was in full action, he was then an upcoming essays and poems composer. He managed to get his first collection of writings published. The title of the group was Color. This was a huge milestone for him as many other poets, including Leroy Locke, were astonished by the creativity in such a young poet and branded him as a genius. Comparing his pieces to other talented poets, Alan said that Cullen's work did surpass all the qualifications that have been before setting by other writers.

The writer made proper use of the Harlem revival to boost the growth of his poems and went on to publish more and more writings. The poems include; The Black Christ. After a long period of writing poems, this American writer finally released his first novel titled One Way to Heaven.

  1. James Baldwin

James was a great poem writer who later went on publishes novels during his stay in Switzerland. Creative essay writing was something he was gifted with as he wrote on the issues of race in America and other white countries where racism was a big issue. James was born in 1924, and as a young boy, he grew up with his stepfather who worked in the church as a servant of God. His entire upbringing, Baldwin never got a chance to know who his true daddy was and this pain is well pronounced and felt in some of his famous novels;

  • Giovanni's Room
  • Tell me when the train left
  • Tell it On the Mountain

It was in Greenwich Village that James found inspiration to begin his writing, and has since then been a great inspiration to the poverty stroke locals who needed someone who'd uplift them and remind them of a better tomorrow. His hometown lives to remember and celebrate Baldwin as a hero who exposed and wasn't shy to talk of the injustices in the society.

Many of his works are based on the events that surrounded his era, and as at theta moment, the main bone of contention was racism. He had to remind people about the importance of equality for all and how noble it is to respect human rights. He faced a lot of challenges from forces against him, and this prompted him to move to France. Some of James' great pieces of literature include:

  • The Evidence of Things Not Seen
  • Above My Head
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